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Dr Hattie Bartlam-Brooks

Dr Hattie Bartlam-Brooks has worked on a number of herbivore projects in the northern Botswana, focussing on improving understanding on what controls herbivore distribution patterns and how this can be applied to improve conservation practices. She completed her PhD through the University of Bristol in 2009. She has a particular interest in herbivore migrations and in 2008 documented the re-establishment of the second longest zebra migration in Africa. Hattie continues to set-up and supervise a wide variety of applied research projects in northern Botswana, working closely with the Mammal Research Group, University of Bristol, UK and the Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana.

Seasonal Home Ranges Of Non-Migratory Zebra In The Central And Peripheral Okavango Delta

Seasonal-home-ranges-of-non-migratory-zebra

The availability and quality of preferred forage changes seasonally (East, 1984), as does the availability of palatable water (Redfern, 2003). It could therefore be expected that herbivores may alter their ranges seasonally, ensuring that they can access the best forage as it becomes available. In the most extreme situations this can lead to a migratory existence (Fryxell, 1987), as discussed …

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Eco Evolution Land Use By Zebras

eco-evolution-land-use-by-zebras

Most large-bodied wildlife populations in sub-Saharan Africa only survive in spatially contained protected regions (Newmark 1996). However, many are still declining because external changes influence ecological processes within conservation areas, leading to a lack of functionality (Western et al. 2009; Fynn and Bonyongo 2010). Wetland ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to external land use changes (Turner et al. 2000). The Okavango …

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A Case Study Of A Zebra (Equus Burchelli) Migration In Botswana

A Case Study Of A Zebra (Equus Burchelli) Migration In Botswana

Historically, migrations or long-distance seasonal movements were common in a wide range of marine, freshwater and terrestrial taxa (Berger, 2004). Terrestrial mammal migrations, defined by Berger (2004) as ‘seasonal movements between discrete areas that are not used at other times of the year’, used to occur in most grassland and boreal forest ecosystems in Africa, Asia, Europe and North America …

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Normal Intestinal Flora Of Wild Nile Crocodiles In The Okavango Delta, Botswana

Normal-Intestinal-Flora-Of-Wild-Nile-Crocodiles-In-The-Okavango-Delta-Botswana

Normal Intestinal Flora Of Wild Nile Crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) In The Okavango Delta, Botswana Owing to the difficulty in obtaining biological specimens from wild crocodilians, very little is known about their normal intestinal flora. The intestinal tract flora isolated from wild-caught African dwarf crocodiles (Osteolaemus tetraspis) has been reported. Salmonellae isolated from wild Nile crocodiles from Lake Kariba, and from …

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